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Full text of ""Lest we forget." Oliver Hazard Perry, the war of 1812, the battle of Lake Erie. The centennial celebration"

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OLIVER HAZAREUPERRY 










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PRESENTED liY 




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"LEST WE FORGET" 

OLIVER HAZARD PERRY 

The War of 1812 

The Battle of Lake Erie 

THE CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION 







CLEVELAND 
1912 



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OLIVER HAZARD PERRY 



Herewith is a copy of a letter from the son of 
Commodore Oliver Hazard Perry to the Hon. Harvey 
Rice. Mr. Rice was a member of the Cleveland 
City Council, and he was the prime mover in the erec- 
tion of the Perry statue in the city of Cleveland. The 
letter is now in the possession of the Western Reserve 
Historical Society, as is also the copy of the portrait 
which belonged to Mr. Rice, these having been pre- 
sented to the Society after the death of Mr. Rice, by 
his heirs, in accordance with his request. 

Lowell, October 18, 1860. 
Harvey Rice, Esq., 

Cleveland, Ohio. 
Dear Sir: — 

I have taken the liberty to forward by express 
prepaid to your address, a box containing two copies 
from "Stuart's" portrait of my father, painted by Mr. 
Lawson of this city. 

You will confer a favor upon me by accepting 
one of the paintings as a token of my respect and 
esteem. May I ask you to present the other in my 
name to your City government, requesting such dis- 
position made of it as may to them seem most appro- 
priate, believing that so patriotic a people will value 
the portrait of one they have been pleased to honor? 
Should you visit the East I shall hope to have the 
pleasure of meeting you in Massachusetts. 
Very truly yours, 

(Signed) O. H. Perry. 




u 

Si 



"LEST WE FORGET" 

The War of 1812 is a subject with which every 
thinking man and woman, boy and girl, in Cleveland 
will wish to be familiar during this year of Centennial 
celebration. 

Much has been written on the various battles, and 
the men who took part in them. Many of the engage- 
ments were on land, but the most important were 
fought at sea; and the one in which we of Ohio are 
most interested is the Battle of Lake Erie, and the 
famous victory of Oliver Hazard Perry. 

Every school boy and girl knows that many men 
and officers were killed in that engagement; that the 
enlisted men were buried at sea (in Lake Erie) at 
night; and that the bodies of the officers, both English 
and American, were taken to Put-in-Bay Island and 
buried in a spot near the lake shore. 

At the Western Reserve Historical Society is a 
large oil painting, executed by an artist who lived in 
Cleveland many years ago, Mr. Chevalier. This 
painting depicts the burial of the officers. The two 
fleets are drawn up in the background, while in the 
foreground is the scene of the last sad rites. 

It is a realistic and an interesting picture; the fierce 
conflict of the previous day is over; the ships ride at 



anchor on a lake that is calm and placid; one can 
almost hear the lapping of the waves upon the shore. 
But the triumph of victory is hushed in the presence 
of death. The brave of both armies had given their 
lives for their countries ; and now, here, far from home 
and loved ones, their bodies were to be laid to rest to 
"sleep the sleep that knows not breaking, morn of toil 
nor night of waking." 

For one hundred years these graves have remained 
unmarked by a suitable monument. At last the people 
of the adjacent states together with the Congress of 
the United States have decided to honor the memory 
of Perry and his brave men by a monument that shall 
speak eloquently of their appreciation and love. 

Every citizen of Cleveland, every boy and girl, 
will surely wish to do his or her part in the celebration 
which is to commence next July and continue to 
October. Cleveland must not lag behind her sister 
cities and towns in the celebration which is to lead 
up to the laying of the cornerstone of the great 
monument. 

Let every one begin at once to read up on the War 
of 1812. 

One of the most thrilling and graphic accounts of 
the Battle of Lake Erie is that by George Bancroft, 
the historian. This may be found in a work published 
by the City of Cleveland in 1860, which gives the 



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proceedings of the inauguration of the Perry Statue 
which now stands in Wade Park not far from Euclid 
Avenue. 

And, by the way, the reading of these proceedings 
reveals the fact that the fire of patriotism burned strong 
in the hearts of the people in 1860. The statue was 
then placed at the Public Square, and the occasion 
of the unveiling was one of the greatest events in the 
history of Cleveland. 

The Governor of Rhode Island and his staff were 
present; the officers of the state of Rhode Island; the 
members of the Rhode Island legislature, and the 
famous Providence Light Artillery. Also Governor 
Dennison of Ohio, and his staff were present. And 
many relatives and descendants of Commodore Perry, 
and many surviving soldiers of the War of 1812, 
were the guests of the city of Cleveland for the auspi- 
cious occasion. There were two or three who had been 
with Perry in his engagement. One of these was Dr. 
Usher Parsons, the surgeon of the flagship. He 
made an address to the assembled multitude, describing 
the scenes on board the Lawrence during and after the 
fierce conflict. 

To this inauguration of the Perry statue the people 
flocked from every nearby town and hamlet. They 
came in every conceivable kind of conveyance. In 
1 860 the population of Cleveland was only 43,4 1 7. 



And for this celebration there were 100,000 visitors 
in Cleveland! 

The account reads like a fairytale. "For two or 
three days previous the railroads had been bringing 
in large trains loaded down with people to attend the 
great celebration * * * The crowds poured in at 
such a rate that it seemed as if there would be no room 
left for the crowds that were to arrive on Monday. 
On Monday morning the trains came in loaded down, 
inside and outside, and on the top. Never before did 
cars come into Cleveland so densely packed with 
people. The masses of humanity clinging to them, 
wherever foothold or handgrip could be obtained, 
could be likened to nothing but a swarm of bees on 
a bush * * * Steamboats from Buffalo, Detroit and 
Sandusky * * * Teams came pouring in, in endless 
procession, and undoubtedly brought more than all the 
railroads added together * * * Thousands * * * 
came in on foot." 

And at that gathering stories were told, by those 
who were living at the time of the victory, — forty 
years previous — of how the news was carried, and 
how it was received by the people. Quoting again 
from this fascinating account — "Captain Johnson says 
that on the morning of the memorable 10th, (1813) 
he and a gang of men were just putting the finishing 
touches to the first court house and jail, which stood 



6 



right in front of the present First Presbyterian Church. 
They thought they heard thunder, but looking out of 
the windows saw no clouds, and concluded it was the 
roar of cannon. They were expecting to hear news, 
knowing that Perry's fleet had passed up the lake. 
They all went to the bank of the lake * * * All the 
villagers assembled there, numbering perhaps thirty. 
They could distinguish between the reports of the 
larger and smaller guns. They staid on the bank 
until the reports ceased, and the last four or five 
reports being from heavy guns, and it being known that 
the Americans had the heaviest ordnance, they con- 
cluded that the victory was ours, and then on the spot 
they gave cheers for Perry." 

A letter written from Buffalo, dated September 
1 9th, 1813, reads as follows: "You can easily imagine 
the effect of this news upon our villagers, and the 
soldiers stationed in this vicinity. I cannot describe 
it to you. Be assured we all breathe easier, for we 
believe that a blow has been struck by our noble tars 
that will be felt throughout our whole frontier * * * 
This evening every tenement of the village, that has 
a window, is to be brilliantly illuminated." 

Probably this "brilliant illumination" was by means 
of candles. 

How many citizens of Cleveland have seen the 
Perry statue which was erected in Cleveland in 1 860 ? 



How many know who was the sculptor of the statue, 
and how the money for it was raised by gifts of the 
people? 

How many have seen the oil portrait of Oliver 
Hazard Perry which hangs in the Council Chamber, 
at the City Hall? How many know that this portrait 
was presented to the city of Cleveland by the son of 
Commodore Oliver Hazard Perry as a token of appre- 
ciation of the honor shown his father's memory by 
the people of Cleveland? How many know that this 
portrait is a copy made by a Mr. Lawson of Lowell, 
Massachusetts, from the celebrated original painting 
by Gilbert Stuart? 

How many know that there is another copy of the 
Stuart portrait of Perry hanging on the walls of the 
Western Reserve Historical Society? 

Oh, Citizens of Cleveland, pause for a brief space 
in the mad rush of life! Turn your thoughts back- 
ward to 1812; gather about the firesides of your 
homes the members of your families, old and young, 
and read aloud — and discuss — the thrilling accounts 
of the War of 1812; the events which led up to the 
Battle of Lake Erie, and those which followed; instill 
into the minds of your sons and daughters the meaning 
of that war, its causes, and its far-reaching results. 
Study the maps, and realize what a different tale 
might have been told had not the dauntless Perry 



8 




PLASTER CAST OF THE PERRY STATUE 

By William Walcutt, 1860 



opened the way to the later victories that resulted 
in the present boundary line between Canada and the 
United States. 

Then you will need no urging to respond to the call 
to add your mite to help make the coming Cleveland 
celebration a brilliant success; one which shall be 
recorded on the pages of Cleveland's history as having 
been as stirring and as wonderful for the year 1913 as 
was the one attending the inauguration of the Perry 
statue in 1860! 



The Western Reserve Historical Society possesses 
many rare publications on the War of 1812. It has 
also published a series of Tracts on the subject. These 
are now very scarce and out of print. 

The collection of manuscripts belonging to the So- 
ciety is a notable one; including hundreds of letters, 
orders, forage papers, petitions and muster rolls. 
Among the official documents is the original manu- 
script of Hull's "General Orders** to his army, con- 
taining the articles of capitulation, which give the 
details of the surrender of Detroit to the British, 
August 16, 1812. 

In addition to the painting already mentioned as 
being on the walls of the Society's building, the Muse- 
um contains the original plaster cast of the Perry 



9 



statue; and the plaster relievo which depicts the Com- 
modore as he passes in a rowboat from the Lawrence 
to the Niagara. 

The Museum also contains the sextant taken by 
Commodore Perry from Commodore Barclay in the 
engagement on Lake Erie, as well as a piece of wood 
from the hulk of the Lawrence, and a few pieces of 
cannon balls. The frame on the oil painting of the 
burial scene is said to be made from a heavy oak 
timber of the same ship. 

The Society's collection of books on the War of 
1812 will be open to adult readers, for reference only, 
daily, excepting Sundays, from nine a. m. to five p. m. 
The customary fee, of ten cents, for consulting the 
historical library, will not be charged for the use of 
this special collection during the coming year, by 
courtesy of the Western Reserve Historical Society. 
Annette P. Ward, 
Librarian, Western Reserve Historical Society. 



10 



Perry and His Battle 



1 




Me of Lak- I 

■ 
(In Lake Erie) 

rn Reserve Historical so- 
ciety Is a large oil painting, executed by 
an artist who lived In Cleveland many 
years ago. Mr. Chevalier. This painting 
depicts tbe burial of the officers. Tho 
lp In the back- 
In the foreground Is the 
■ i rites. 

a interesting plc- 

confllct of the previous 

ships ride at anchor on 

a lake that Is calm and placid; one can 

■--: of tho waves 

- the triumph of 

■■■■■H|naamaB 

Bth armies had 

for their countries; and 

i from home and loved 

to be laid to rest 

to "sleep the sleep that knows not 

breaking, morn of toll nor night of wak- 

■raves have re- 
Itable monii- 
:. a adjaoent 
ill tho congress of 
I States, have decided to honor 
the memory of Perry and Ma brave men 
numont that shall speak alo- 
of their appreciation and love. 
citizen of Cleveland, every boy 
and girl, will surely wish to do his or 

, next July 



trait of Oliver 


Hazard Perry wl 






oiincll chamber at 




•lty hall? How many know that 




portrait was presented to the cits 




Cleveland by I 


le son of C 


Oliver Hazard 
appreciation of 




of 




his 


father's rfle i 




Ho 








i a copy made b 




Mr. Lawaon o 






the celebrated 


original painting 










How many k 








the Stuart portrai 




Perry* hanging 








Relics of the 






The Western 


Reserve Historical 


HO- 




many rare publications 


on the war of 


1S12 It has also pub- 



Ooto 






the 



and graphic 

of the battle of Lake Erie 

Bancroft, the hie- 

be found In a work 
city of Cleveland In 
h gives the proceedings of the 
ttion of the Perry statue, which 
Lds In Wade park, not far from 



The Celebration of 1800. 

To this inauguration of tho Perry 
(looked from every 
town and hamlet. 1 

ile kind of convey- 
■ 
oi this celo- 
100.000 visitors In 



Ject. These are now very scarce and 

In addition to tho painting already 
as being on the walls of the 
society's building, the museum contains 
the original plaster cast of the Perry 
statu.*, :Lnd tho piaster relievo which de- 
picts the commodore as he passes In a 
rowboat from the Lawrem-. 
Niagara. 

The museum also contains the sextant 
taken from Commodore Barclay In thi 
engagement on Lake Erie, as well as a 
plecs of wood from the rnuT 
Lawrence and a few pieces of cannon 
balls. The frame on the oil painting of 
the burial scene is said to have been 
made from a heavy oak timber of the 
same ship. 

The society* eoU.-<Mlon of books on 
tho war of lSlt will be open to adult 
ly, daily, ex- 
cepting Sundays, from a. m, 



Uncle Biff Says: 



Ajid at tho gathering ^ ! - 

lug at the 

nra prevl- 

,w the new, was carried, and 

how It was revived by tho people. 

.i count of 

ion nays that on tho 

■ lust put- 
ilng touches to the llrst 
!. which stood right 
Ihc present First Prcsby- 

B out of the 



inon. Thoy i 




CLF.VELAND PLAIN DEALER 
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 25, 1912, 

— S' 




,1. illegally n«- 



„lt.-.l State! 
commissi..! 




For sale in 

The East O 

621 Superior 




r^ 

Perry and the Famous Battle of a Century Ago. 



BY ANNETTE P, WARD, 

Mbrnritin of the Western Reserve 

Historical Society, 

The war ol iml' is a i bji I with 

every thinking man and woman, 

uid girl in { •!. v. land ti I i wish to 

uiliar during this 

ebration. 

Much has been written on the various 

Who took part in 

Us i mi nta were 

i important were 

fought at sea; and the one in which we 

ni i ihio are most lnt< i ested Is the ba t- 

i.nke Krle and the famous victory 

He ard I'erry. 

Everj scl Iboj and girl Ifnows thai 

many men and officers were killed in 

ngagement; tliat the enlist 
were bui led a I sea (in Lake Erie) at 
night] and that the bodies of the offi- 
cers both i Ingllsh and !uni i m, wen 
taki n to Put-In-Bay is and and buried 
io1 neai the lake 'bore. 

! rve Historical so- 

exei uted bj 

i who lived in Cleveland many 
igo, Mi ' hei ilier. This painting 
the burial of the officers. The 
i wo Heel an drawn up In tl ■ 

while in the foreground is the 
he last sad rites. 
[t i a realistic and an Interesting pic- 
i onflict of the pre\ lous 
i i.lc at anchor on 
that is calm and placid; on 
almost hear the lapping of the waves 
the shore. But the triumph of 
tied in the presem 

both i us had 

livi s for their count! let and 

1 re, far from home and loved 
ones, their bodies were to be laid to rest 

'" "sleep the si that knows not 

In i .-iking, morn of toil run- night of wak- 
ing." 

For 100 years these graves have re- 
main! d unmai ked bj a sultab'e monu- 
I - last the people of the adjacent 

with the eongn 
id Sta tea, ha i e dei ided o honoi 

the mem-" i o Pel nd hi brave 

by a n 

loi lovi 

bo 
Ish to do his or 

commence next July and 

land must not lag he- 
ld I s in the 

la to had up to the 

monument. 

ol the most thrillin 

of the battle ol Laki Erii 
la that hi George Bancroft, thi 

iiis maj be found In a work 
land in 
I860, w] h ,, t - the 

ition of the Perrj 

ids in Wade park, not far i 

Kuelid-av. 

the reading ol these 

patriotis irned strong In the 

■ ,ii i 

: : . 

Ch veland. 



The Celebration of is<;i>. 

I hi i |i land and his 

ta n n .-.in i he offlcei a ol the 

stale ol Rhode Island; the members of 

the Rhodi I I tnd 1< islature, im 

famous Providence Light artillery. 

Alsi, llm . I I, inn i II i„, | |, is 

stau wen in, i-iii And many rela- 
tives .i mi Hesci 

Perrj i urvlving soldiers of 

i in wai "i 1812 were the guests of the 
Cits of ' il the ausiiicious 

I en v en I WO or three who 

een with Perrj In his engagement. 
one .it these was Dr. Usher Pi 
the surgeon of the flagship. He ma. le- 
an address to the assembled multitude, 

| n 

rence - ! nd aftei tin Hi rce con- 
flict. 

To this inauguration of the Perry 
ople flocked from every 
town and hamlet Thi 
in everj ci mcelvable kind of - 

in i860 tin- population of Cleve- 
i- only -1:1.417. And for this cele- 
bration there were 100,000 visitors in 

The account reads like a fairy tale. 
"For two or three days previous the 
urging ill large 
trains loaded down with people to at- 
tend the 

poun d : lt( that it seemed 

as if there would be no room left for 
the crowd thai were to arrive on Mon- 

ii i .inlay morning the trains 

came in loaded down, inside and out- 
side, and mi the top. Ni 

n. nun i !levela nd 

I v n h i I- The n " d 

inanity clinging to them, wherever foot- il 
'hold 01 

eo ' '■■ !'!■ i i S but .i - 

ol i - on a bush. Steamboats from 

Buffalo, Detroit and .Sandusky. Teams 

n 
and undoubtedly ta ought mure than all 
i he ra llroads added I ogi thei Thou 
sands came in on foot." 
And at the gathering si 
n>e who were livi 
time of tin 

how i he news was i 

hon i i w . . i 

count, Capl Johnso 

morning o 10th (1818) 

men were just put- 
ting the finishing tou 

■ ■ and jail, whi.-l 
in front of I lie pre n 

i bought they 

heard thunder, bul 
windows saw no cloi d 
■ 
i - hear news, kno 
PeiTy's fl<_>< i had up the lake. 

They all went to the bank 
ah the villagers assembled l 

i ps i nii'i i . Thej could dis- 
tinguish bel w.-en thi 

. ■ 
"u the hank until thi 
■ 

vic- 
tory was ours, and I lien 

I ei ry." 



A letter written from Bull 

s ,.,,t. it.. 1813, read as folio - 
imagine the effi 

news upon and the 

,,., i itloned In this vicinity. l 

, anrmt describe (I to you He assured 

bi ick ii.\ "in 

nuhie tars that will be Celt I ug I 

,,„,- w hole I i -nun. i . Tin , 

,-n, in hi i ill ' tl 



he hri 



ill. i 



nated." 

this "brilliant illumina- 
tion" was by means of candles. 

How many citizens of Cleveland 
have seen the Perry statue which was 
Cleveland in 1860? How 
many know who was the sculptor of 
the statue. unney for it 

u.i- i Used by gifts of the people? 
I'erry Memorials. 

seen the old por- 

r Hazard Perry which 

council cliamln ■ 

How many know that this 

ed to 1 h e city of 



|IuW 1IIUI1- 

tiai \\ 

hangs In th 



ri, -\ ela 

in, , , Hazard Pe 
ion of th 



shown hi 



bj the people of 

Cle\ eland" llmv many know that 

,, i rail is a copy made by a 

Mr. haws, m of Lowell, .Mass., from 

the celel I original painting by 

Qilbert Stuart? 

How inanv know that there is an- 
lie Stuart portrait of 
on the walls of the 
\v. - Hie ::, erve Historical socli - 

Oh. citizens of Cleveland, p i u 
a brief space in the mad rush of life! 
Turn -"in thoughts backward to 
1812; erather about the firesides of 
your homes the members of your 



fami 
a loud 
count a 



I the war of 



the thrilling ac- 
1X12: tin 
battle of hake 



if Hint war 



ling re- 

.- : ■ 

tnid had nut the da 

' he way to the later victories 

that resulted in I lie pre:-. ml I nd.i i . 

line between Canada and the United 
States. 

Then you will need no urging to 

respond to the call to add vonr mite 

■ ling Cleveland 



bration a brilliai 
eland 



Slleeess; 



- I' '■ 

tirring and as wonderful for the 
lending 

iguration of the Perry statue 

10! 
RellCS of the AVur. 
''' ■■'■ 1 esti m Ri erve Historical so- 

cietj 

- ol 1812 i 
series of tracts on the sub- 

i : 

print. 

I;t addil on to tl Intl already 

med as being on the i ,, , . 

o etys building, the mu leum • 

' Of the Perry 
lull de- 
es in a 
U from the Lawrence to the 

The museum also contains the sextant 

'■' ' "i i - [ore i '.i - la v in the 

■II as a 
wiin, | ti-oni the hulk of the 

'■ mi the oil painting of 

lal scene is said t„ have been 

made from a heavy oak timber of the 

inn 

it of books on 
ol 1812 will be open to adult 
for reference only, daily, ex- 

mla . u 

10 cents for con- 

g ult ing thi hist, ,, in no , 

special 

ming v.-ar. bv 

ra Reserve His- 

oi ,i ociety. 



Perry and His Battle 



■ 



They all went to the bank of the lake. 
All the villagers assembled there, num- 
bering perhaps thirty. They could dis- 
tinguish between the reports of 



BY ANNETTE P. WARD, 

Librarian of the Western Reserve 

Historical Society, 

- ..o^o • v.4 j i*i. tinguish between the i 

of. ..1812., is a subject with , 
nrnw^m, * —■» ~* mviJarerer and smaller guns. They 

S~TXn7 V6a K th9 faCt that thecal society. 

nre of patriotism burned strong in th* ' 

hearts of the people in I860. The statu! 

was then placed at the Public sauar! 

and the occasion of the unveiling" w as 

one of the greatest events in he hit 

tory of Cleveland. 1S 

The Celebration of I860. 

«Z° ^ ' inau ^ ura «on of the Perry 
statue the people nocked from every 
near-by town and hamlet. They came 
in every conceivable kind of conveT 

land was only 43,417. And for this cell 
CletlLdf^ ™ **«* Vl — * 

And at the gathering stories we 
told, by those who were living at the 

o^*^* r/*° ry - fOPty years pre Vi ! 
ous-of how the news was carried and 
how it was received by the n^ 

.the day, "Capt. Johnson says that on the 

morning of the memorable 10th (1812? 

he and a gang of men were Just put 

ting the finishing touches to £• %£t 

court house and Jail, which stood right 
in front of the present First Presbv 
terian church. They thoughf 2 
heard thunder, but looking out of tZ 
windows saw no clouds d 




raiDAV AN ^?^ IN DEALE * 
' OCT °BER 25, 1912.